Tobacco Control Program

Mission...

Teen SmokingTo educate and empower adolescents and adults on the hazards associated with tobacco use, so they can make informed decisions to adopt a smoke-free lifestyle and take action to protect their right to live in a tobacco-free environment.

 

Did you know that...

In St. John Parish the COMMUNITIES That Care Youth Survey said:

24% of 6th Graders 45% of 8th Graders 57% of 10th Graders 64% of 12th Graders
have experimented with Cigarettes!!

To Learn More, please click here www.dhh.state.la.us/OADA/community-care/ or,  
if you would like help to quit smoking, call the American Lung Association hotline at 1-800-LUNG-USA.

  • 1999 Louisiana State of the Heart Report published by the American Heart Association
    for St John Parish listed:

    Number of Cardiovascular 1997 Deaths - Male 60 Female 47
    Number of Deaths 1997 All forms of Cancer: 83

    In addition to it's well-known association with cancer, smoking is a major CVD risk factor. In fact, each year smoking causes more deaths from heart attacks than from cancer. For more information, visit the American Heart Association or Cancer
     Association.
     
  • Contact the Louisiana Tobacco Control Program (LTCP) to:
    Learn more about tobacco issues; Be referred to an agency that can help you quit smoking; Have someone assist you with tobacco control activities in your community

    For more information visit their website at www.lsuhsc.edu or call (504) 588-5428
     
  • Tobacco use among children and teens has reached epidemic proportions. Every day
    more than 3,000 kids in America become regular smokers; one-third of them will die
    prematurely from lung cancer, emphysema, heart disease and other tobacco related diseases. Currently, an estimated 4 million kids between the ages of 12 and 17
    are smokers, collectively smoking more than 500 million packs of cigarettes a year.
    Almost 90 percent of adult smokers began at or before age 19.

Want to protect kids from tobacco addiction? Join the CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO-FREE KIDS.
Visit their website at www.tobaccofreekids.org or contact them at 1707 L Street, NW Suite 800, Washington, DC 70036 or telephone (202) 296-5469 or Fax (202) 296-5427.

EFFECTS and HAZARDS OF SMOKING

cigaretteA lit cigarette produces more than 4,000 chemicals. Among these chemicals are at least 43 known carcinogens (cancer-causing agents) and more than 400 other toxins, including the addictive drug nicotine.

Tobacco use remains the single most preventable cause of death in the United States. Cigarette smoking kills about 430,000 Americans every year---more than the deaths from AIDS, alcohol and drug abuse, car accidents, murders, suicides, and fires combined.

Inhaled smoke carries nicotine into the lungs, where it is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and carried to the heart and brain. In the brain, nicotine stimulates the central nervous system. After 20-40 minutes, this stimulation begins to wear off, leading to withdrawal symptoms and the desire for more nicotine.

Many people mistakenly believe that smoking cigars and pipes are safe alternatives to smoking cigarettes. The truth is that the tobacco in cigarettes, cigars, and pipe tobacco is the same. Cigar and pipe smokers face a host of dangerous health problems: heart disease and cancers of the lung, larynx, esophagus, and mouth.

What is Secondhand Smoke? Also known as passive smoke or environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), secondhand smoke is a mixture of the smoke that comes from burning tobacco and the smoke exhaled by a smoker. Because the smoke from a burning cigarette is unfiltered, it contains twice as much tar and nicotine as the smoke inhaled through a filter. Secondhand smoke is classified by the U.S. Environmental Agency (EPA) as a Group A carcinogen. The Group A designation is reserved for substances proven to cause cancer in humans.

The negative effect smoke has on a child can begin even before birth. An unborn baby receives poisons from cigarette smoke through its mother’s bloodstream. Pregnant women who smoke are more likely to have a miscarriage or stillbirth; they are also more likely to have premature deliveries than nonsmokers.

Because their bodies are still developing, children especially are endangered by secondhand smoke. Secondhand smoke can provoke colds and sore throats, as well as worsen the effects of a number health conditions: eye irritations, sinusitis, and chronic respiratory problems such as coughing, wheezing, and postnasal drip. It also contributes to middle ear disorders.

For more information you can email us at greg.maurin@stjohnsheriff.org